Doodlebops big stars in kid rock

ROCK STARS: Doodlebops Moe, left, Rooney and Deedee play trains with three-year-old Jenna Goldsack on a visit to the London Public Library yesterday (Feb. 14). The stars of a children's show on CBC television were promoting a concert at Centennial Hall in April.
CREDIT: DEREK RUTTAN

CBC-TV children's entertainers the Doodlebops -- a trio of make-believe siblings billed as the "kids' favourite rock band" -- loved the toddlers right back.

"Have you been waiting long?" a Doodlebop asked the kids who had been sitting patiently with parents before the trio trooped into the downtown library.

Deedee, Rooney and Moe Doodlebop were in full makeup, time-consumingly applied, and Doodlebop beautiful from their woolly wigs and padded gloves to their brightly-coloured running shoes. Soon their fans were all around them.

The singing and dancing Doodlebops are huge hits with the three- to five-year-old age group. "What other band out there is going for them?" said Deedee after their meet-and-greet appearance to publicize an April show in London.

Many of the 130 fans in the crowd getting autographs and giving hugs at the Spriet Family children's library were even younger than three.

"She will stand in front of the TV and wobble back and forth," dad Kevin Brooking of London said of 14-month-old daughter, Naomi, and the way she enjoys the group's pop tunes and dance moves.

Older brother Connor, who is about 3 1/2 , had approached the trio to sign his copy of their hit CD. His Doodle-pride was suddenly swept away by oodles of shyness.

"He attached himself to my leg," smiled mom Dianne Brooking. Connor's CD did get signed as Deedee, Rooney and Moe autographed and posed with the cheerful crush of young fans.

The three use their stage names when they're in colour-coded Doodlebop mode. That's pink and purple for keyboardist Deedee, blue for guitarist Rooney and orange and red for drummer Moe. Without taking them out of character, it's possible to report all three have solid entertainment pedigrees.

The kids' rock group makes sure they do more than just entertain. Many of their songs send positive messages to kids about getting along, sharing and solving problems.

"I'm going to go with sharing," Moe said asked to sum up the Doodlebops in a word. He had more time to reflect on the phenomenon after his stage siblings popped out their answers. "Energy," said Deedee. "Fun," said Rooney.

They also know their classic rock bands. Moe mentioned the Beatles and Deedee the Monkees as examples from the pre-Doodle era.

The Doodlebops play Centennial Hall on April 9 at 1:30 p.m. The London stop is part of a Canadian tour. On some dates, extra shows have already been added.

"We love the live," Deedee said of the trio's chance to tour and interact with kids for an hour of music and dance.

Season 2 of The Doodlebops debuted on CBC-TV in December.

Produced by Toronto's Cookie Jar Entertainment, the show is reported to be the highest rated weekend show on the U.S. Disney Channel for kids ages two to five.

Free Press Staff
London Free Press

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